Philadelphia's Mayoral Primary Winner Wants To Tackle Crime With More Policing

Cherelle Parker and several other Democratic candidates campaigned on a pro-police, tough-on-crime agenda.

By Hudson Crozier

Yesterday: Democrat Cherelle Parker won the mayoral primary election in Philadelphia. As the city has seven Democratic voters for every Republican, she will almost certainly beat her Republican challenger in November and become mayor.

Why it matters: Philadelphia voters overwhelmingly see the city’s high crime rates as the biggest problem for the next mayor to address. This comes as progressive agendas such as defunding the police and lowering incarceration rates have dominated for years, especially since 2020, and reflects nationwide trends in blue cities. Parker and several other Democratic candidates campaigned on a pro-police, tough-on-crime platform, indicating a possible path toward change.

Her mission: Parker aims to “stop the sense of lawlessness that is plaguing” Philadelphia by putting more police officers on the streets. She will grant officers full authority to conduct “stop-and-frisk” searches, despite local progressive activists labeling the practice as racially discriminatory.

By contrast: Helen Gym—whom numerous leftist politicians and organizations have endorsed, including Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Sanders—rejected the idea of greater reliance on law enforcement. Gym praised Minneapolis officials for trying to abolish their police department and wants mental health workers to take some 911 calls. By leaving her in third place, Philadelphia voters are abandoning unconventional, ideologically driven strategies against crime that have failed to keep their community safe.

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